Feelings

Have you ever tried teaching feelings and emotions using emoji or emoticons? Capitalize on this popular social media device by teaching young learners about feelings and adjectives with our NEW Feelings Vocabulary Lesson! (more…)

Feelings: Photography Project

How are you feeling today? Are you happy, sad, angry, or sleepy? Talking about emotions is a great way to review adjectives with your young learners. Turning feelings into a photography project really engages your students! (more…)

Superlative Adjectives

Which animal is the furriest? Our brand-new Superlative Adjectives lesson gives young learners a lot of practice comparing groups of people, places, and things.

This colorful, eight-page lesson starts off with a simple explanation that reviews the form and function of the grammar target. It is followed by a variety of activities such as a fill-in-the-blanks exercise, a spot-the-errors exercise, and a group work exercise that are sure to engage your students. There is also a bonus page on spelling rules for adjectives ending in -est that you can hand out and review with your class if needed. (more…)

Comparative Adjectives for Describing People

In English, we use adjectives to describe nouns (people, places, or things). What about when we want to compare two nouns? Comparative adjectives are useful to learn so that students can compare different things. There are a few rules for forming comparative adjectives, which your students can learn in our new Comparative Adjectives lesson (in the Grammar School section of Sprout English). Once students have learned these rules, get them to practice using this worksheet on describing people. On Thursday, Tara will blog about a fun activity for comparing people, so be sure to check back then!

You’ll find two worksheets, one with blank spaces for students to fill in the comparative form of the adjectives, and another with the answers already filled in. You can use the one with the answers as an answer key for students to check their work themselves or as a handy reference sheet for Thursday’s activity. (more…)

Comparative Adjectives

Is sushi tastier than pasta? Our brand-new Comparative Adjectives lesson gives young learners a lot of practice comparing people, places, and things.

This colorful, eight-page lesson starts off with a simple grammar explanation. This is followed by a variety of activities such as a fill-in-the-blanks exercise, a spot-the-errors exercise, and a pair work exercise that are sure to engage your students. There is also a bonus page on spelling rules for adjectives ending in -er that you can hand out and review with your students if needed. (more…)

Adjectives for Describing the Face

Our Spotlight lesson this week is The Face, a fun and colourful vocabulary lesson from our Word Bank – Describing People & Things section. As a follow-up and expansion, try teaching some common adjectives that your students can use to describe the face and hair. You can also use these adjectives with Tara’s vocabulary activity (which will be on our blog on Thursday). Scroll down to the end of this post for examples, sentence patterns, and a discussion on comma placement with multiple adjectives.

Eyes (more…)

Adjective Sentence Patterns & Suffixes

English language learners study the Be verb early on, and they learn about adjectives soon afterward—adjectives usually appear in simple sentences with the Be verb (e.g., I am happy and That is a big house). This week’s featured lesson was on Adjectives that describe feelings, so I thought a blog post on the grammatical structure of adjectives would be useful for your students!

What do our students need to know about adjectives? First of all, we should explain that adjectives are used to describe nouns. Adjectives can describe the shape, color, age, details, etc. of a noun, and they can describe the emotions associated with a person or thing.

There are two things to “master” about adjectives: the sentence patterns and the suffixes. Once your students learn both, they’ll have adjectives in the bag! (more…)